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Hunter Gets Indicted

Hunter Biden -- New York Post

“There is no public evidence that Joe Biden abused his government powers to help his family,” CNN asserts.

On the other hand, The Daily Caller insists, “Here’s All The Evidence Connecting Joe Biden To Hunter Biden’s Foreign Business Dealings.” The Caller cites a raft of evidence: “Witness testimony, emails, text messages, flights and additional evidence indicate Joe Biden was knowledgeable about Hunter Biden’s business dealings and communicated with his son’s business associates on numerous occasions.”

Henry David Thoreau memorably said that sometimes “coincidence” is important – “as when you find a fish in the milk pail.”

The presence of a fish in a milk pail almost certainly means that some guilty party put the fish in the milk pail. Fish do not swim from the Concord River across farmland and plop themselves in milk pails. And though the fish in the milk pail coincidentally suggests the presence of solid evidence that some kid is playing pranks, we need not assemble a jury of his peers to find him guilty as supposed.

There are two kinds of “evidence.” When a lawyer speaks of evidence, he means – provable data that will support an indictable charge. When the editor of your daily newspaper speaks of evidence, he means – damaging fish-in-the-milk-pail data pointing to the guilt of some party that the editor need not suppose is “innocent until proven guilty.” If the opinion editors of publications were seriously to embrace the notion that “everyone is innocent until proven guilty” in a court of law, we all might have been spared tons of editorials trumpeting the guilt of former President Donald Trump that is transparently obvious to editorial sleuths.

The notion that “there is no evidence” tying together the Bidens, father and son, and other Biden family members, in what may be a bribery scheme to personally enrich them is a non sequitur, if one is using the word in its legal sense -- because there can be no jury finding of guilt or innocence of a charge that has not yet been adjudicated in court.

Though a bold writer, Thoreau was not careless in his use of words. Often, the good people of Boston did not wish to hear them. Bostonians could tolerate and even appreciate Walden Pond, but they drew a red line at Slavery in Massachusetts, a roiling protest of Massachusetts’ indifference to the Fugitive Slave Law, which permitted slave owners to enter Massachusetts and reclaim their “property.”

In our own day, many environmentalists and public school teachers continue to have their students read Walden Pond, but Slavery in Massachusetts, written by a white, privileged male … not so much. The author of Walden Pond also wrote an appreciation of John Brown, the notorious, Connecticut born abolitionist who jump-started the Civil War by raiding Harper’s Ferry hand in hand with the property of slaveholders who sought to reclaim their escaped slaves from abolitionists like Thoreau and Brown.

Hunter Biden, like Thoreau a white privileged male – Thoreau’s father owned a prosperous pencil making factory -- last week was indicted on three felony counts involving the illegal possession of a firearm, according to the New York Times. If convicted on all counts – including lying to a federally licensed gun dealer, making a false claim on a federal firearms application used to screen applicants, and possession of an illegally obtained gun – the president’s son is facing about twenty years in the pokey.

Even so, some consider the indictment less problematic a matter than Hunter’s peculations with serious enemies of the United States such as Russia and China. The indictment was brought forward after a backroom deal between the prosecution and Hunter Biden’s defense attorneys fell apart like a handful of brittle lace.

ABC News tells us, “Federal authorities with the U.S. attorney's office in Delaware, led by U.S. Attorney David Weiss, a Trump-era appointee, have been investigating Hunter Biden since 2018, before Joe Biden announced his 2020 presidential bid.” So far, five years of a careful investigation of the “evidence” against the Bidens has produced a squealing mouse.

The prosecution of Hunter Biden by a laggard prosecutor whose hand ultimately was forced by a judge cannot please the Bidens, father and son.

Still less pleasing is a Republican led U.S.  House investigation of Biden the younger on tax charges and his failure to register as a foreign agent in the service of countries such as fascist China and Vladimir Putin’s colonialist regime. No loyalists in the Biden administration want prosecutors to trace foreign payments -- possibly for services rendered -- to “the Big Guy,” a reference in Hunter Biden’s emails to then Vice President Joe Biden.

But, not to worry. Hunter Biden’s lawyers have just filed a suit that seeks to prevent witness testimony from two FBI whistleblowers, and possible tax charges are self-elapsing on account of statute of limitation laws.

Then too, the Bidens can rely on strong winds at their backs blowing their tattered cause forward by an incurious media and faithful political accomplices, many now busily showing Joe Biden’s presidential competitor the road to the Big House.

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