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When Is a Fetus a Baby?


U.S. House members Rosa DeLauro and Elizabeth Esty, the congresswomen from Planned Parenthood, are mightily disturbed by a bill that passed the House that would ban abortion once the fetus is older than 20 weeks, except in rape cases or those in which the life of the mother was at risk.

The bill cuts off abortions after 20 weeks because it is at that point that the child in the womb can feel pain.

"The Baby Center" shows animations of babies after 20 weeks here:  At 24 weeks the baby, according to The Baby Center, is capable of living outside the womb with some assistance.

Ms. Esty said, “It’s offensive and, frankly, sad that House GOP leaders are once again debating one of our most fundamental rights as women. This legislation is a direct challenge to our reproductive rights. It’s contemptuous towards women’s health. And, it is a tremendous waste of time when we have serious work to do.”
It should be noted that the bill does not prevent women from getting abortions; it allows abortion before 20 weeks.

Ms. DeLauro said, “This blatantly unconstitutional legislation threatens the health and basic rights of women all over America. Right now, we should be working to create jobs and grow the economy. Instead, here we are again with the Majority trying to insert their extreme and divisive ideological preferences into law.  This bill puts the federal government squarely between a woman and her doctor.”

Comments

enness said…
I'm a woman and these two are offensive to me.

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