Thursday, July 05, 2018

The Repeal Of Roe v Wade, A Democrat Strawman?


As July rose and June set, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy surprised everyone by announcing his retirement from the high court. Kennedy’s leave-taking will allow President Donald Trump to appoint yet another justice; this when leftists in the United States have yet to recover from his last appointment, Neil Gorsuch.

It is difficult to pigeonhole Kennedy ideologically. According to the Cato Institute, a reliable conservative organization, Kennedy’s judicial philosophy does not fit neatly on a conservative or liberal grid: “Most terms he agreed with Cato’s position more than any other justice and so he’s also sometimes known as the Court’s ‘libertarian’  justice. There’s some truth to that, even though he often reached results that libertarians liked for reasons that [supported} dignity and civility rather than classical-liberal or natural-rights theory.”

Kennedy’s announcement brought the mourners out in droves, pitchforks in hand.

U.S. Representative Rosa DeLauro, “a cheerleader and part prognosticator” on the left, according to CTMirror, sounded the alarm:  “This [yet another Trump appointment to the Supreme Court] has to be raised to a decibel level that is deafening around the country. We thought that they could never take it away but it gives you some sense of how fragile democracy is … we are fighting for the soul of this country and for democracy in the next several months.” DeLauro was alluding to the likelihood that a Supreme Court with Trump’s nominees might result in the repeal of Roe v Wade.

Some legal scholars argue that the intellectual path to Roe v Wade was tortuous. Deriving a constitutional  right to abortion from a 14th amendment fashioned in the post-Civil War Period to prevent states from depriving newly liberated slaves of “ life, liberty, or property, without due process of law” struck some constitutionalists as a form of juridical necromancy on a par with deducing Shakespeare from lamb chops.

Others thought the court’s insistence that the fetus should be shorn of all human rights until courts and legislatures thought it politically convenient to assert such rights was too clever by half. However, a majority of the voting public would agree that the defective means used by the high court to arrive at its decision should not invalidate the end point. Abortion, if not late term abortion, has now become, as the lawyers say “settled law.” The possibility of a repeal of Roe v Wade is highly unlikely. However, the remote possibility is used by demagogues as a sump pump to push campaign money into the war chests of DeLauro and other Democrat members of Connecticut’s U. S. Congressional Delegation.

Connecticut’s U.S. Senators, Dick Blumenthal and Chris Murphy, have announced their opposition to any Trump nominee to the high court. Blumenthal, not up for re-election in November, would be happy if Trump should reseat Kennedy following his retirement – not likely. Both intend to use the remote possibility that Roe v Wade will be repealed only to generate funds for the cause.

“As a candidate,” Murphy said, “I will be raising money. I will be organizing volunteers around one of the most important jobs of a United States senator, which is to make sure that the Supreme Court reflects the values of the country.” Murphy has $8 million tucked away in his campaign kitty, but more of a good thing is a better thing. His Republican opponents collectively are unlikely to pass the million dollar mark – advantage Murphy.

Unlike DeLauro and Murphy, Blumenthal will not be campaigning for re-election this year. But is it never too soon for entrenched incumbents to begin amassing campaign war chests. “As a non-candidate,” Blumenthal said, “I’m going to be using this issue to sound the alarm, as a call for action, a five-alarm fire, a break-the-glass moment. This kind of moment is going to be front-and-center in this election for sure.”

If Blumenthal ever does lose his seat in the Congress – a possibility as unlikely as the repeal of Roe v Wade – he easily could assume the position now occupied by Cecile Richards. Born (she was lucky) July 15, 1957, Richards has served as president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and president of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund since 2006.

Blumenthal, whom some have characterized as “the senator from Planned Parenthood," has sternly opposed all reasonable attempts to impose restrictions on abortions – incredibly on moral grounds. A bill “requiring parental notification prior to a minor obtaining an abortion, unless the minor gives notice that she fears for her safety, in which case the matter shall be referred to the courts” – Raised Bill 324 -- was introduced by State Senator Len Suzio during the 2017 session. Blumenthal’s assent to the measure was notably lacking. And we know why.

Two thirds of Americans – 60 percent of women – believe late term abortion should generally be illegal, and 80 percent oppose abortions in the third trimester, a point at which the developing child can live outside the womb and late gestation increases risks of complications. In 2016, Blumenthal proposed a piece of legislation, S 1696, that effectively wiped out in a single stroke carefully calibrated state laws, including  regulations on abortion after viability, and bans on the use of abortion as a method of sex selection.

Bills such as those introduced by Suzio are popular with parents whose best interests are not represented by the senator from Planned Parenthood. But Blumenthal has the advantage of both a massive campaign kitty and an uncritical media. Connecticut’s regulator-in-chief when he was the state’s Attorney General for 20 years, now the senator from Planned Parenthood, can well afford to play the yo-yo to abortion facilitators and claim, implausibly, that any attempt to regulate an industry that aborts late term fetuses and sells their body parts is morally indefensible.


Monday, July 02, 2018

Courant Preparing Not To Endorse Herbst


It’s a pretty safe bet that former First Selectman of Trumbull Tim Herbst, now vying with Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton in a Republican Party Primary, will not be receiving the Hartford Courant’s gubernatorial endorsement in the upcoming 2018 general election. Elephants will fly first.

There are sound reasons to suppose the chatter around the water cooler at the paper is not favorable to Herbst.

Sunday, July 01, 2018

The Democrat's Progressive Pickle


It seems clear that state Democrats will be running against President Donald Trump in the 2018 elections. They already are doing so. Will this be a winning strategy?

Ned Lamont is the Democrat Party nominee for governor. His hand-picked Lieutenant Governor running mate is Susan Bysiewicz. Lamont is facing within his own tribe a primary challenge from Mayor of Bridgeport Joe Ganim. A straggler, Guy Smith, has bowed out of the race. Ganim, despite his recent graduation from prison, may present a real threat to Lamont.

The two Democrats will be running against each other in a party primary, the winner of which will, it seems likely, be running against Trump, if only because the primary victor will not be able to win in a general election as a Malloyalist progressive.

Friday, June 29, 2018

What Connecticut Can Learn From the Capital Gazette Shooting


Most left of center commentators lost interest in the Capital Gazette shooting in Annapolis Maryland soon after it became obvious that there was little to no connection to Trumpian rhetoric slighting the “fake news” media. For any number of good reasons, media face time procured by the state’s two U.S. Senators, Dick Blumenthal and Chris Murphy, was minimal.

Moments after the shooting, Murphy issued a dog-eared, often repeated refrain: “I’m sick and tired of this. My colleagues have accepted horrific mass violence and made the deliberate choice to do nothing about it. If politicians wanted to reduce gun violence, they would do their jobs and pass laws that we know would make a difference.”

Thursday, June 28, 2018

High Court Confirms Workers’ First Amendment Rights

To compel a man to furnish contributions of money for the propagation of opinions which he disbelieves, is sinful and tyrannical –Thomas Jefferson

The sentiment above is to be found in an Act for Establishing Religious Freedom, a bill drawn up by Thomas Jefferson as part of the Revised Code of Virginia laws, but the sentiment might easily apply to Janus vs. AFSCME, a decision rendered recently by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Saturday, June 23, 2018

Blumenthal's Route To Trump’s Heart



The members of Connecticut’s U.S. Congressional Delegation, all Democrats, are not dummies. Savvy professional politicians, they know that the way to President Donald Trump’s heart is through the mouth of Ben Carson, Trump’s U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary.

In a Journal Inquirer news report on June 21,2018, we find four members of the delegation – U.S. Senators Chris Murphy and Dick Blumenthal, plus U.S. Representatives Joe Courtney and John Larson – thanking Carson for having taken the time at their urging to visit a house in Connecticut the foundation of which was crumbling because the cement used to make the foundation was contaminated with pyrrhotite, a mineral that causes deterioration when exposed to groundwater.

Saturday, June 16, 2018

Lamont’s Post-Convention Messaging


Ned Lamont, the Democrat Party’s certified candidate for governor, having run the nomination knout, is now proceeding to run primary election bases.

NBC Connecticut has noted a pronounced difference in messaging: Lamont Distances from Malloy at Technology Forum.

Governor Malloy has relied on targeted tax reductions and tax grants to persuade companies to remain in Connecticut and avoid migrating to other states in order to escape the governor’s burdensome taxes and the Democrat dominated General Assembly’s noxious regulations.

"I think we've gone snap happy in terms of trying get and keep businesses,” Lamont said at a forum hosted by the Connecticut Technology Council. Lamont told the group he was not interested in providing bailouts to Connecticut’s tax starved cities: "I'm not interested in bailouts, I didn't like that deal at all, but there have to be other ways to help our cities,” which are, never-the-less, critical to the growth of the state.

Monday, June 11, 2018

Themis Alive


Some time ago, Republican leader in the State House Themis Klarides reminded a reporter that she was Greek. Her first name, she said, meant “justice.”

That was almost right. Themis was an ancient Greek Titaness, the “lady of good counsel,” a personification of divine order, fairness, law, natural law and custom. The name Themis literally means “that which is put in place.” The symbols by which Themis is known are the scales of justice, tools in the ontological order that assure balance.

Balance is the baseline in the Greek cosmos according to which right order is measured. To know whether a thing is right and just – morally, legally, ethically, religiously, secularly, atheistically -- one must have more than a nodding acquaintance with reality. Idle dreaming is a fatal threat to right order. Political visions – modern politics is consumed with visions the ancient Greeks might have considered nightmares – are justifiable and practical only when they take into account the reality of life on the ground. Therefore, the best and most just politician is the one most solidly grounded in reality.

Friday, June 08, 2018

Murphy’s Money



It was a trifle embarrassing, but U.S. Senator from Connecticut Chris Murphy was able adroitly to dodge the bullet.

“This week,” the  Journal Inquirer reported “Murphy dodged questions about [receiving campaign] tainted money from Spitzer, and instead focused on contributions from average people.”

Elliot Spitzer, a former New York Attorney General and Governor, resigned blushingly in 2008 to dodge impeachment following reports in the New York Times, the JI reported, “that he had patronized prostitutes, highlighting a meeting for two hours with a $1,000-per-hour prostitute…

Tuesday, June 05, 2018

Truman Revisited



Image result for harry TrumanA historical revision of Harry Truman has been underway for some time. Historians are now smiling at the 33rd President. His was an accidental presidency, and his contemporaries, the political swamp of his day, did not like accidents. The more things change, as the French say, the more they remain the same.

Victor David Hanson -- a classicist historian and the author of “The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won,” in addition to “A War Like No Other,” the best and most riveting account of the Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC) between Athens and Sparta -- has written the best short account of the Truman presidency for The Washington Times.

Anti-Trumpists will be spooked by the title and subtitle: “Truman as a model for Donald Trump: The outsider president succeeds because of what he does, and in spite of what he says.”